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First Attempt at Gathering Statistics

So this week I took notes on my play, hoping to get an idea of what I should be paying attention to statistically.

I played first for my team through all three games, and played both ends of the alley in game one. Over three games, I played a total of 40 balls. Ten of those balls were leading off a round, 29 were lagging at an established point, and one was a raffa shot which went horribly wrong.

Game One:

  • I played 12 balls total
  • Leading off four times, I held the point against 0 balls (i.e. the opponents first ball took the point), 1 ball, 2 balls and held against all four opponents balls in the last frame. I think this is a pretty important stat and should be a good indicator of your lead-off lagging ability. If you can place the first ball close and make your opponents burn a bunch of balls chasing that you can gain a huge advantage. Further, you greatly increase your chances of throwng the last ball (or maybe two or even three balls after your opponent is done, which is huge.
  • The other eight balls here were all regular lagging attempts to make the point. Of these, I made point 7 times.
  • Our team scored 12 points, which puts me at 0.5 points per ball played. I think I need to sharpen this up a bit and start examining how many points I’m actually responsible for (either by directly taking the point or indirectly by either bumping a teammate’s ball into scoring position or by shooting an opponents ball that is beating a teammate’s ball, etc).
  • We gave up 2 points. Not bad, especially considering the team we were up against.

Game Two:

  • I played 14 balls, all from one end of the court.
  • Leading off four times, I held the point against 0, 4, 0, and 0 balls. Not so great.
  • Shooting once, I not only missed my target but hit my teammate’s (very well-placed) ball, costing our team two points. Disastrous. :(
  • Lagging against an established point nine times, I made the point four times.
  • On my end, we scored a whopping two points and gave up seven. We lost this game 9-12.

Game Three:

  • Again, fourteen balls, all from one end.
  • Leading off two times, I held against four balls and two balls. Much better.
  • Lagging in 12 times, I made point 9 times.
  • My end scored nine points and gave up two. We won this game 12-11 in a real nail-biter.

Now, this is pretty rough data. I’d be interested in something like lagging accuracy, some sort of average distance from the target, but getting that data would be cumbersome and nobody wants to wait around while we measure every single ball that gets played. Shooting accuracy is much easier since you either hit the target or you don’t. I’d also like to account for the fact that the distance to the target can vary wildly; I personally perfer to play a deep game, placing the pallino near the end of the alley when possible. This could have a negative effect on (e.g.) my teammates’ shooting accuracy. Someone on a team who plays the short game more often might have a higher shooting accuracy percentage but actually be an inferior shooter at equal distances. I think classifying shots as short, medium or long should be granular enough to make this sort of problem mostly go away.

I’m going to start keeping my personal stats in an excel spreadsheet, but I suspect that the data I collect in-game will change pretty significantly over the course of the season.

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